Total
0
Shares
Scott Morrison (left) and Justin Trudeau (right) at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Summit in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea, November 18, 2018. Source: Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press via AP
Market Herald logo

Subscribe

Be the first with the news that moves the market
  • Following a conversation on Tuesday, Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau have agreed to coordinate their efforts in making tech giants pay for news
  • Canada vowed last week to be the next country to make Facebook pay publishers for news content
  • Canadian publishers have said an Australian approach to tech giants would allow media companies to recover C$620 million (roughly A$629 million) a year
  • Without action, they said, Canada could lose 700 print journalism jobs out of a total 3100
  • The collaboration comes as anti-trust investigators in France accuse Google of failing to comply with the state competition authority’s orders on how to conduct negotiations with news publishers

Following a conversation on Tuesday, Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau have agreed to coordinate their efforts in making tech giants pay for news.

In addition to discussions about COVID-19, vaccination programs, the ongoing situation in Myanmar, and the broader Indo-Pacific region, the two leaders “noted the growing cooperation between Canada and Australia on the regulation of online platforms,” a statement from Trudeau’s office said.

“They agreed to continue coordinating efforts to address online harm and ensure the revenues of web giants are shared more fairly with creators and media,” it continued.

Canada vowed last week to be the next country to make Facebook pay publishers for news content, following Australia’s example in the crusade against the power of platforms like Facebook and Google.

Canadian Heritage Minister Steven Guilbeault, in charge of crafting legislation to be unveiled in coming months, condemned Facebook’s decision to remove news from it Australian platform and said it would not deter Ottawa.

“Canada is at the forefront of this battle […] we are really among the first group of countries around the world that are doing this,” he said.

Last year, Canadian publishers warned of a potential market failure without government action, adding that the Australian approach would allow media companies to recover C$620 million (roughly A$629 million) a year. Without action, they said, Canada could lose 700 print journalism jobs out of a total 3100.

The collaboration comes as anti-trust investigators in France accuse Google of failing to comply with the state competition authority’s orders on how to conduct negotiations with news publishers over copyright.

Two sources said the 93-page report, known as a statement of objections, found exceptionally serious failures, which could result in a fine worth up to 10 per cent of the firm’s US$183 billion (roughly A$231 billion) in sales last year.

More From The Market Herald

" Labor releases emissions target ahead of 2022 federal election

Labor has announced a plan to reduce Australia’s greenhouse gas emissions by 43 per cent by 2030, as the party gears up for

" Watchdog sues Coles (ASX:COL) over staff underpayments

Coles (COL) has been accused of underpaying more than 7500 employees by $115 million between 2017 and 2020, according to an investigation by

" CBA flags private markets and investor demand as necessary drivers of net-zero targets

Commonwealth Bank (CBA) has flagged private markets as a necessary component of achieving net-zero carbon emission goals by 2050, as agreed upon at

" Clean energy transition could grow QLD economy and jobs market: Deloitte

A new report from Deloitte Access Economics, commissioned by climate change activist group The Climate Council, found Queensland’s economy and job market will