Self-charging battery. Source: Strategic Elements
Market Herald logo

Subscribe

Be the first with the news that moves the market
  • Strategic Elements (SOR) announces a significant improvement in the performance of its prototype Battery Ink cells
  • The Battery Ink technology is being developed with the University of New South Wales and CSIRO to create self charging batteries that harvest energy from humidity
  • Screen printed prototype cells generated over 250mAh of electrical charge from moisture over three days — a 150 per cent increase to the 100mAh reported in September 2021
  • While, electronic skin patches remain the immediate focus for the current quarter, investigation into other uses of the Battery Ink technology have commenced
  • Company shares are up 6.38 per cent to trade at 25 cents

Strategic Elements (SOR) has reported an exceptional outcome for the Battery Ink technology.

The company is collaborating with the University of New South Wales and CSIRO to create self-charging batteries that harvest energy from humidity.

The battery technology is a liquid ink based on graphene oxide able to harvest energy from the humidity in the air or skin surface to quickly and efficiently charge themselves without the need for manual charging or wired powered.

Prototype Battery Ink cells were screen printed onto flexible plastic and successfully generated over 250 milliamp hours (mAh) of electrical charge solely from moisture over three days. This marks a 150 per cent increase to the 100mAh reported in September last year.

In addition, over 5 milliamps (mA) of electrical current was achieved over the three-day testing period.

“Traditionally the electrical charge produced by emerging battery technologies only increases by small, incremental amounts each year. To achieve a 150 per cent increase and generate 250mAh of electrical charge solely from moisture so early in development is an exceptional outcome for both the team and the company,” SOR Managing Director Charles Murphy said.

Strategic Elements expects that one of the first electronic devices to be powered by the Battery Ink cells will be electronic skin patches that monitor health, well-being and sports performance. Printed/flexible electronics are reportedly suitable to wearable skin patches due to their low weight, conformality, and potential for high-throughput, low-cost manufacturing.

Unlike traditional batteries, the Battery Ink cells can be printed in different shapes and sizes, potentially enabling the technology to fit new electronic devices with different flexibility, size and shape requirements and their different use cases provides the company with alternative commercialisation and partnering options.

While electronic skin patches remain the immediate focus for the current quarter, investigation into other uses of the Battery Ink technology has commenced.

Company shares were up 6.38 per cent to trade at 25 cents at 1:45 pm AEDT.

SOR by the numbers
More From The Market Herald

" Johns Lyng Group (ASX:JLG) CEO and COO sell shares worth $12.5m

Johns Lyng Group (ASX:JLG) has advised Managing Director and CEO Scott Didier, along with Executive Director and…
IGO (ASX:IGO) - CEO & Managing DIrector, Peter Bradford

" IGO (ASX:IGO) produces first battery-grade lithium hydroxide from Kwinana refinery

IGO (ASX:IGO) has produced the first battery-grade lithium hydroxide from the Kwinana Lithium Hydroxide Refinery in…

" Seafarms (ASX:SFG) appoints Rod Dyer as CEO among executive changes

Seafarms (ASX:SFG) has appointed Rod Dyer as CEO, effectively immediately.
Recce Pharmaceuticals (ASX:RCE) - Chief Executive Officer, James Graham

" Recce Pharmaceuticals’ (ASX:RCE) clinical trial returns positive safety profile

Recce Pharmaceuticals (ASX:RCE) has seen its clinical trial receive a good safety profile among ten healthy…