Total
0
Shares
West Aussie clean beef sets sale for Southeast Asia
Market Herald logo

Subscribe

Be the first with the news that moves the market
  • West Australian company Wide Open Agriculture has secured a major licence today that will see it go global
  • The company now has its hands on a meat export licence for business opportunities in the Southeast Asian market
  • Wide Open practices "regenerative farming" — a business model of cultivation that aims to preserve the environment and reduce the human footprint
  • This practice speaks to an emerging interest in consumers around the world that seek to support cleaner agriculture
  • Shares in the company underwent a massive boost of 16.7 per cent today to trade for 17.5 cents each

Are you familiar with regenerative agriculture? The practice that promotes clean farming for high quality produce and low-human presence.

One West Australian company, Wide Open Agriculture (WOA), has seen strong positive feedback from individual customers and restaurant clients across the state.

Today it announced one of its biggest leaps yet: going global with a meat export licence for the Southeast Asian market.

"Western Australia’s leading chefs and online consumers have validated our position as a premium, healthy food brand," WOA Managing Director Dr Ben Cole said.

"We are excited by the opportunity to offer our innovative brand and exceptional grass-fed beef and lamb to Southeast Asian markets," he added.

Conscious produce

According to Meat and Livestock Australia, Aussie beef sales to Southeast Asia reached $850 million and lamb achieved $330 million during last year.

"We have recently engaged in a number of meetings and farm visits with online and retail distributors with sales channels in Singapore, Hong Kong, Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia and China," Dr Ben continued.

"With this licence we are now armed to progress these discussions to the next stage of business development."

It's no secret that regenerative agriculture speaks to a conscious minded demographic seeking sustainable meat produce. From 20 hospitality clients alone, the company amassed $40,000 in sales revenue earlier this year.

"Our objective is to be the brand of choice for conscious consumers in Australian and Asian markets," Dr Ben added.

"Conscious consumers demand amazing taste and quality but also the provenance of regeneratively farmed products."

For those interested in the cleaner alternative farming for dinner can also order it straight to their home. Wide Open launched its "Dirty Clean Food" platform in August to sell the grass-fed beef and lamb to your doorstep.

The company even expanded its business into a hemp crop trial in rural WA earlier this month. This trial is part of a statewide initiative by the Western Australian Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development.

Since announcing the major export licence win today, shares in Wide Open have rocketed 16.7 per cent on the Australian market to trade for 17.5 cents each.

WOA by the numbers
More From The Market Herald
The Market Herald Video

" Fertoz (ASX:FTZ) pockets $1.5M from oversubscribed rights issue

Organic fertiliser producer Fertoz (FTZ) has raised $1.519 million through an oversubscribed, one-for-seven non-renounceable rights issue.
LawFinance (ASX:LAW) bolsters balance sheet, shuffles leadership team

" Roto-Gro (ASX:RGI) subsidiary secures new Australian patent

Roto-Gro Inc, a wholly owned subsidiary of Roto-Gro International (RGI), has secured an Australian patent for its stackable modular rotatable gardening system.
RotoGro closing in on Asian hemp market

" Roto-Gro International’s (ASX:RGI) 420 Inc. acquisition burns out

Roto-Gro International (RGI) has pulled the pin on a majority acquisition of 420 Inc., citing extensive associated costs and transactional delays.
Select Harvests (ASX:SHV) posts positive almond outlook despite flood delays

" Select Harvests (ASX:SHV) posts positive almond outlook despite flood delays

Almond producer Select Harvest (SHV) is remaining positive in its almond crop outlook despite the impact of the recent flooding in NSW on